How coal mining is trashing tigerland

How coal mining is trashing tigerland

Even as the environment ministry continues to come under pressure to fast track coal mining in forest areas, this analysis by Greenpeace shows how coal mining threatens over 1.1 million hectares of forest in 13 coalfields alone in Central India.

Even as the environment ministry continues to come under renewed pressure to fast track coal mining in forest areas, a GIS analysis released by Greenpeace titled “How Coal Mining is Trashing Tigerland” shows that coal mining threatens over 1.1 million hectares of forest in 13 coalfields alone in Central India. The analysis, conducted by the Geoinformatics Lab at ATREE (Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment) overlaid maps of the 13 coalfields with forest cover, Protected Area boundaries and the latest government data on tiger, elephant and leopard presence. The report highlights the massive costs India is facing from the huge expansion in coal mining. Forest corridors connecting eight tiger reserves – including some of India’s finest such as Tadoba-Andhari, Kanha and Bandhavgarh - are at risk. These corridors have been identified by the government’s own Tiger Conservation Authority as essential for the species’ long term survival, yet they also face the threat of coal mining from the Coal Ministry.

See Also

Report: Undermining Tadoba's tigers.

In-Parliament: Environmental clearance to coal projects.

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Report: GoM to suggest solutions on coal and other development issues.

Report: Financial risks of new coal fired power plants.

Report: Integrated energy policy.

Presentation: Mapping coal blocks and forest cover.

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